Coordinated Mobility Plan

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The Coordinated Mobility Plan describes how the region will improve mobility for youth, older adults, persons with disabilities, people with low incomes and other populations that face mobility challenges. It outlines how transit agencies, human service agencies, school districts, and other specialized transportation providers can work together to improve regional mobility for people throughout King, Kitsap, Pierce, and Snohomish counties. This plan is part of PSRC's Regional Transportation Plan. Work has begun to update the Coordinated Mobility Plan for adoption in 2022.

Specialized transportation services are transportation options for people who have difficulty transporting themselves due to age, income, or disability. Examples of specialized transportation services include paratransit buses, shuttles (typically requiring scheduling a ride in advance), volunteer driver programs, and school buses.

Three images showing examples of specialized transportation services including a paratransit bus, shuttle, and a private vehicle of volunteer driver program.


The Coordinated Mobility Plan describes how the region will improve mobility for youth, older adults, persons with disabilities, people with low incomes and other populations that face mobility challenges. It outlines how transit agencies, human service agencies, school districts, and other specialized transportation providers can work together to improve regional mobility for people throughout King, Kitsap, Pierce, and Snohomish counties. This plan is part of PSRC's Regional Transportation Plan. Work has begun to update the Coordinated Mobility Plan for adoption in 2022.

Specialized transportation services are transportation options for people who have difficulty transporting themselves due to age, income, or disability. Examples of specialized transportation services include paratransit buses, shuttles (typically requiring scheduling a ride in advance), volunteer driver programs, and school buses.

Three images showing examples of specialized transportation services including a paratransit bus, shuttle, and a private vehicle of volunteer driver program.


Stories Tool: Share Your Transportation Story

PSRC invites you to share your transportation stories and experiences with us. You can submit stories about your own experiences, anecdotes from others, photos, drawings, and even audio and video recordings. PSRC will gather your stories to better illustrate the mobility needs of the region.

NOTE: Once you submit your story, it will be available to the public. If you do not want to provide stories below but want to share with PSRC staff, please send your stories to Gil Cerise at gcerise@psrc.org

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    Tanisha's transportation story

    about 2 months ago

    “I often use my wheelchair in the road. I’ve had people yell at me that it’s not safe, and I understand, but they don’t understand. If I get thrown off the sidewalk into traffic because there's a root or an uneven piece of the sidewalk, that is not safe.”

    Tanisha lives in West Seattle and gets around on Metro buses and her wheelchair. The biggest barriers she experiences are sidewalks that don’t have curb cuts or that turn into dirt paths or roads without notice, forcing her to turn around and go all the way back and find someone's parking... Continue reading

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    Micah's transportation story

    about 2 months ago

    “Eight-five percent of the world functions without a car. Let’s just normalize public transit. Let’s normalize paratransit. At the core it's about providing access and opportunity.”

    Micah is a blind UW student studying to become a high school English teacher. He works for the Department of Services for the Blind, teaching high school students independent living skills. He moved from Kent to Seattle and finds the University District is much more accessible for him. He gets around mainly by walking, but takes the bus if it is too far to walk. Micah can now walk to most places he needs... Continue reading

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    Marilee's transportation story

    about 2 months ago

    “For a while, I lived right in downtown Everett. I could go on the spur of the moment very easily. Buses were very close by….I’d like to just go to the mall on the spur of the moment. And they don't even have bus service there now on Sundays. That's the day I would most likely want to just get out.”

    Marilee lives in Everett. She relies on paratransit, fixed route buses, friends, family and walking to get around. Her biggest barriers are the time it takes to plan a trip — checking schedules, making a paratransit appointment, and making... Continue reading

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    Claudia's transportation story

    about 2 months ago

    Claudia lives in Auburn and takes the bus, usually the 184 and 160. The biggest barriers for Claudia are that sometimes when she needs the bus to get to work, it doesn’t stop because there are already a lot of people on board. Claudia doesn’t speak a lot of English, and so it’s not always simple to ask for directions or ask the driver questions she might have. She would like elected leaders to know that the bus needs to run more frequently, and that, above all, that bus stops be better equipped for hot and cold weather.

    Story provided... Continue reading

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    Lisa's transportation story

    about 2 months ago

    “We live two miles from the nearest bus stop and there are no sidewalks the entire way and that makes it even more difficult to travel independently.”

    Lisa is legally blind. She lives in Tacoma, Washington and gets around by bus. Her biggest barrier is that she has to walk two miles from her house along a road without any sidewalks to catch a bus to go to doctor's appointments, grocery shopping or anywhere. That makes it hard to travel independently. Another barrier is how long it takes to get things done during the day — it makes it difficult... Continue reading

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    Jamin's transportation story

    about 2 months ago

    “I like my freedom and being able to get out on my own and not have to depend on other people, to just have independence. Paratransit takes care of that for me, it gets me to my appointments, it gets me to grocery shopping. I’ve used these services for all kinds of stuff. It's a godsend.”

    Jamin has lived in Port Orchard since 2010. He has been using transit and paratransit for the last ten years. The process for getting paratransit service was slow and difficult when he first arrived, but Jamin depends on the service to get him where... Continue reading

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    Kris' transportation story

    about 2 months ago

    “On a typical day before COVID, I would get up and catch the 7:15 a.m. bus outside my apartment, take a three-minute bus ride down to the ferry terminal, where I would switch buses to the 390. The 390 would take me out to the Poulsbo Park & Ride. At that point I would switch to a bus that would take me down to Silverdale Park & Ride. At Silverdale Park & Ride, I would then switch on to another bus that would get me into Bremerton. That was my commute. It took two hours. It's a 30- to 40-minute... Continue reading

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    Amandeep's transportation story

    about 2 months ago

    “Some bus stops don’t have shelters and it’s hard for people to be waiting for over half an hour in the winter, especially for people with a disability or a Blind person. Sometimes if you miss one bus, you have to wait two hours for the next one. It’s not a good service for people who rely on public transportation.”

    Amandeep is a Blind student who lives in Lynnwood and attends Everett Community College. She gets around using the bus. One challenge is that the buses she needs don’t stop very close to campus. Another is that bus announcements aren’t... Continue reading

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    Jo Ann's transportation story

    about 2 months ago

    “In order to travel to Evergreen Hospital in Kirkland to see my neurologist, I would have to take TAP, transfer to Dart and then transfer to King County Access.” This would be completely exhausting; especially since it involves three transfers. It is so easy just to walk out to the garage and put your keys in the ignition and go. Jo Ann says, “If I could drive, it would only take 20 minutes.”

    Jo Ann lives in Bothell, Washington. She uses TAP Transportation around town, which is offered through Homage Senior Services. TAP takes her to the grocery store, LA... Continue reading

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    My transportation story

    by Leigh , 3 months ago

    I am a woman who walks with crutches. I live independently, and I work part-time in Snohomish County. I don’t drive because of my disability, so I have to rely on public/paratransit transportation to get around. While this does allow me to get out, and participate in my community, there are limitations.

    Paratransit is described as an accessible form of transportation that aligns with a fixed route bus system within each County. Here in Washington State (Western Washington, specifically), the paratransit bus systems have agreements to arrange for cross-county travel. This has allowed me to travel to work, grocery shopping... Continue reading